54 Ways for Kids to Make Money Fast

Good Jobs for Teens

Though having a job may seem like part of adulthood, there are many ways you can make money when you’re still in school. A lot of these positions can be part-time, which means you’ll still have time to study (sigh).

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19. Personal Assistant

Do you know an adult who is unusually busy?

That person may need help with a wide variety of small jobs. That can be anything from running errands to doing work in his or her business or profession.

If you have good organizational and administrative skills, this can be a serious moneymaking opportunity. It can also be excellent training for a future full-time job.

12. Session Musician

Are you particularly good with a musical instrument, especially one that would lend itself well to performing artists?

If you can, you might be able to work as a session musician. These are people who play in a music group but aren’t necessarily part of the group.

You get paid on a per gig basis.

Minimum Wage

Under federal law, workers who are under 20 years old have a lower minimum wage than older workers, but only for the first 90 days of employment. This temporary minimum wage for people under 20 is $4.25 per hour. The minimum wage for adults, and for teens after 90 days of employment, is the same: $7.25 per hour. If the local minimum wage is greater than the federal minimum, you are entitled to the higher amount. You also have a right to discuss how much you are paid with your fellow workers.

9. Sell at a Farmers Market Stand

Don't be shy — just walk up to some and ask if they're hiring at your local farmers market! Some might be interested in letting you work a shift or two throughout the day.

If you have something to sell such as hand-made jewelry or lemonade, you could also go through the paperwork of setting up your own stand!

If you don't have a farmer's market in your area, another option is to cater at an event. Unlike a farmer's market stand which usually only happens certain times out of the year, catering can turn into a profitable business that can give you more flexibility in your schedule, and of course, has the possibility of growing much more than a traditional stand at a farmer's market.

What to Do With Your Money

Once you’ve earned some money for yourself you can do whatever you want with it! However, before you go and spend it all, take a look at these other options:

Treat Yo Self

The fact that you’re taking the initiative to start learning how to make money on your own is pretty significant. Not a lot of teenagers do what you’re doing now.

For that reason, once you start making some money, be sure to reward yourself. Go out and buy something that you’ve wanted for a long time. Just don’t go too crazy!

Reinvest in Your Business

If you’ve started one of the side hustles above like reselling things at school or starting a blog, your business needs money to keep running. Make sure to re-invest as much of your profits as possible back into your business so that it can grow.

Save it

Once you start earning money, it’s important that you don’t blow it all. Saving money is an essential rule of finance and learning how to save early on will benefit you greatly later in life.

Plus, if you ever want to make a big purchase (e.g. car, computer), you’ll need some money saved in the bank for it.

Invest it

If you’re only 13, it may seem a bit silly to start investing so young, but by starting early you actually have a huge advantage.

Here’s how:

Let’s say you invest $1,000 when you’re 15. With no additional contributions and an 8% avg. return rate, by the time you’re 45, you’ll have $10,062.66 just from interest.

That’s your money making money without you doing anything.

Now let’s say you waited until you were 20 to invest that $1,000. With the same 8% return rate and no additional contributions, at the same age of 45 years old, you’d have only $6,848.48. That’s $3,214.18 less just because you waited 5 years to start investing.

I wish I started investing when I was younger!

If you want to learn more about getting started, check out this beginner’s guide on how to invest as a teenager.

15. Babysit Neighbors Kids

This is probably one of the most common teen jobs out there — and one of the easiest! Ask around your neighborhood or create flyers to pin up around town can spread the word easily!

Online websites such as Facebook or Reddoor can also help. Chances are someone you know will know someone who will need a babysitter, or they will know someone else to refer you to. Don't be afraid to just ask around!

Tips for Teenagers with Online Jobs

Here are some pointers to help you find success with your online job:

Keep Your Parents Posted

Remember to keep your parents or legal guardians in the loop—they’ll appreciate it. Plus, if you suddenly become richer than them—and they didn’t know where the money came from—they would be worried!

Your parents already know that you’ll learn the value of money when you earn extra cash as a teenager.

Learn on the Job

As you’ll learn, the road to financial independence is paved with patience and hard work. Earning extra money now, as a teenager, will teach you how to succeed when you start making more money later in life.

And these online jobs can teach you a lot about working in the professional world. The same is true for old-fashioned jobs for teens like becoming a babysitter, pet sitter, camp counselor, or grocery bagger. Nothing replaces work experience.

Watch Out for Scams

Unfortunately, the online world is full of scams. When you’re hopeful about starting a new online job, you could fall victim to one of these schemes.

To avoid this, stick to the ideas on my list or vet your job opportunities with these questions:

  • Is the job asking me for money? Whether you’re being asked to buy software or invest in a product, you shouldn’t be parting with money in order to get a job. This is a huge warning sign.
  • Does the employer want me to meet in person? You shouldn’t need to meet an employer in person to become a virtual assistant or a graphic design freelancer. If you do need to meet someone in person, make sure you’re meeting in a safe, public place. And make sure your parents or guardians know what you’re up to.
  • Does it seem too good to be true? You won’t make a hundred grand a year as a proofreader. You won’t become a millionaire by working the survey sites. Over-the-top promises may be strong signals that the job isn’t for real.
  • Are there too many personal questions? Your mother’s maiden name, your middle name, your Social Security number, your bank account numbers… all this info shouldn’t be required for you to get a part-time job or a side hustle gig. Be careful sharing personal data. Identity thieves love to steal credit profiles from young people.

One of the best ways to avoid scams is to source your side hustles from vetted sites. The Steady app compiles legitimate local and national gig economy jobs to help you start earning extra money. It’s 100% free and worth a try if you’re not sure where to start looking.

Get a PayPal Account and a Bank Account for Teens

You may have noticed a lot of jobs on this list pay through a PayPal account, which can link to your bank account.

But PayPal won’t verify an account unless you’re an 18-year-old. So to make this legit, you’ll need help from your parent or legal guardian to set up your accounts.

It’ll take some legwork upfront—and up to 30 minutes of your parent or guardian’s time. But it’ll be worthwhile when you have your own bank and PayPal account set up so you can make money and control where it goes. We recommend starting a checking account to store your money and start building savings for the future.

Learn more:

Bottom Line

This list just scratches the surface of ways for teens to make money. There are many awesome money-making gigs for teens who are looking for summer work.

If you’re creative and willing to put in the effort, there are plenty of opportunities to earn good cash.

What are you doing to make money this summer? 

*Actual earnings may differ and depend on factors like the number of deliveries completed, time of day, location, and expenses. Hourly pay is calculated using average Dasher payouts while on a delivery (from the time you accept an order until the time you drop it off) over a 90 day period and includes compensation from peak pay, tips, and other incentives.

When can you start teaching your kids about money?

Source: Africa Studio/Shuttestock.com

Source: Africa Studio/Shuttestock.com

When kids are toddlers, they are extremely inquisitive and have a strong desire to learn. It is also during this timeframe that they begin to strongly mirror your behavior.

So, it makes sense to begin introducing them to the idea of money when they are in this frame of mind. Around this age, I began teaching my children about money a few different ways:

  • Taking them to the grocery store to look at the price tags.
  • Having them tell me how many fingers something costs.
  • Showing them the different ways you can pay for groceries (credit/debit card, cash, check, EBT card).
  • Buying a play cash register and plastic food to have a pretend grocery shopping trip at home.

If you start with basic lessons and pretend play like this, then building on this financial foundation is much easier as your child ages.

What To Do With The Money You Make As A Teenager

Set Up An Emergency Fund

You never know what expenses may come up when you’re headed to college or even supporting yourself as a teen. It’s important to have an emergency fund to help give you peace of mind when emergencies arise.

Now, an emergency in this situation is not that you found a pair of jeans you love. No! An example of an emergency is when your tire just went out and you have to have it replaced today. If you have money saved for it, it’s easy to cover and you’re not struggling afterward or going into debt to cover the cost.

Whether you’re a teenager or not, it’s SO important to have an emergency fund.

Save For Something You Want

There may be something you’re needing or wanting to buy, and you have to save for it yourself. Maybe it’s a new car, a new laptop, or even a new pair of shoes you’ve been wanting for months.

It’s so rewarding to have money, build the discipline to save for it, and then purchase it yourself. You will appreciate the item more when you buy it with your own money. Plus, you’re building confidence in yourself that you’re able to have the discipline and self-control to save for something worth your money and time. You will thank yourself later!

Save For School

Maybe you’re going to college, trade school, or just wanting to dip your toes in some college courses without committing yet. Having the money saved up to pay for ahead of time will save you SO. MUCH. MONEY.

It’ll save you money in student loans, student loan interest, and spending your student loan money and having to pay it back later. Leaving college or trade school without more debt is worth EVERY penny paying it ahead of time. 

Why you should start building passive income side hustles as a teen

Passive income allows you to make an income, maybe even as much as a full-time job, but without needing to work all the time. The sooner you start building passive income sources, the better.

It will help you save and prepare for the future. It’s beneficial to do this as a teenager because much of your time right now should be focused on your education.

3. It Prepares You For The Real World

When I moved out of my parents’ house, it was shocking to me to learn how much money it costs to live when your parents aren’t supporting you anymore.

You’ll be out on your own one day too, so making money as a teen will provide good experience for you about what it is like to earn and manage your own money.

You might actually be surprised at how you handle the money you earn yourself.

You may handle it differently than you handle the money that your parents give you with no strings attached.

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